vikings

#29) How to Viking-Part 1

Posted on Posted in Badassery, Blog, Season 1

Time: 2-100 hrs

Cost: $2-$10,000

Difficulty: Mid Range

Badassery: 10 Battle Cries out of 10



Childhood Dream….Accomplished

As a kid, I probably spent a good portion of my youth running around with homemade wooden swords, waging wars against trees, and challenging random dandelions to duals. One of my fondest childhood memories is of me riding my bike, homemade numb chucks flailing above my head, and chucking the forcfully bound sticks at any innocent bystander foolish enough to get close (and by innocent bystander I mean trees) I have to admit…I was a massive medieval nerd. And after this experience with The Odins Ravens in Edmonton, that flame as been reignited.

To be honest, I’m not sure if that flame was totally put out. Repressed by feelings of teenage angst maybe…but not put out.


Which Brings Me to My Next Point

Reignite that flame gosh gingit! Unless your childhood hobby was rubbing boogers on the neighborhood cats of course. Please don’t do that.

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But in all seriousness, there is so much beauty in the things you pursued as a child. Whether it was spending countless hours building Lego, dressing up as super heroes, or fighting imaginary demons with swords, it was a form of expression. One that should not be extinguished because of age. A lot which becomes incredible when scaled up to adult budgets and physical capabilities. For example….

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Exhibit 1

 

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Exhibit 2

 

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Exhibit 3


Which Brings Me to Another Point!

It seems like when you reach adulthood, things that are often associated with childhood, become synonymous with the lesser. Though I understand that there are many qualities of childhood that should be left in the past *cough* putting boogers on cats *cough*….creativity and curiosity should not be one them. And I know that sounds obvious, but I think a large part of that (more than you think) gets lost during our transition to early adulthood and late adulthood.

Which is BS.

The individuals I met at Odin’s Ravens were athletes, incredibly talented individuals and some of the kindest people I’ve met in a long time. Many of them constructed their own materials, and put incredible amounts of work into looking and fighting like legitimate vikings. And they do a great job at it. These are guys who follow their curiosity, are extremely creative and know how to have a good time. Maybe scaling up your childhood interests isn’t such a bad thing….

So What Did I Learn?

Not only did I learn that I love fighting with swords and dressing as a viking, I learned that I need to spend much more time pursuing things that interested me as a child…but on a larger scale. Sure I would like to leave 90% of my childhood back before the times of social media, but if I could access even 1% of the creativity I had as a kid, this blog would get a lot more interesting….

Anyways, thanks for reading How to Viking, and we’ll talk next week :)

 

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